Being warm, wet and politically correct

By: Mike Muller

We investigate the virtues of water-saving showers

In Cape Town recently, during one of those cold, wet and windy weeks, I was thinking about hot showers. In particular, I was thinking about the strange enthusiasm of Cape Town based conservationists for water-saving showers.

Read more: Being warm, wet and politically correct

Chinese still struggling to get the small stuff right

By: Mike Muller

Despite being a world-class country, there are still small areas with which China is struggling. We explore these areas and how we can still help them

I always say that the small stuff is much more complicated than the big. Usually, this is about the challenges of making city water systems work. This requires all water users to cooperate both in looking after the installations inside their households but also helping their municipalities to keep the delivery system outside in working order.

Read more: Chinese still struggling to get the small stuff right

Learning from eThekwini’s narrow escape

What are the lessons we can learn from my attendance at the 7th World Water Forum in the Republic of Korea?

Against my better judgement, I attended the 7th World Water Forum in the Republic of Korea in April, to help prepare and run a session with some African colleagues.

Read more: Learning from eThekwini’s narrow escape

Show us the numbers!

By: Mike Muller

Mike Muller is a Commissioner of the National Planning Commission and a visiting Professor at the Wits University School of Governance. He was DG of Water Affairs from 1997 to 2005.

It can be embarrassing to get up in front of an audience and make a strong statement only to be immediately contradicted. That happened to me at a few weeks ago, at the launch of The South African Local Government Association (SALGA)’s fund to reduce water losses.

Read more: Show us the numbers!

When no water is good news and less water is even better

By: Mike Muller

Mike Muller is a Commissioner of the National Planning Commission and a visiting professor at the Wits University School of Governance. He was DG of Water Affairs from 1997 to 2005. It was a little embarrassing: a few weeks ago, I went to talk to a group of residents in northern Johannesburg – well, it would have been called Roodepoort before – about water security. To be positive, I started by asking them how often their water had been cut off over the last few months. Out of a group of 200, just four put up their hands – and they lived in a complex where there had been a problem with the internal plumbing.

Read more: When no water is good news and less water is even better

Accidental rain making and multi-purpose pools

When last month I promised to talk about saving water, I was thinking about the challenges faced by Gauteng. So I was not surprised by the January rains that filled the dams on the Vaal. The best way to make it rain is to warn about drought; the moment you stop worrying, it stops raining. This is a useful lesson. Predicting weather trends is a bit like gambling – in the end, the house always wins. And, generally, you have just as little chance of making successful long range weather predictions. 

So it was KwaZulu-Natal, the province we normally think about as blessed with water, which started the year with drought warnings. At time of writing, their dams had dropped to critical levels and they were talking of restrictions. That was not just because the rains had been poor but because consumption in the areas north of eThekwini is growing faster than the capacity to store water. Meanwhile, Limpopo had the driest January, with many places receiving less than half of the monthly normal.

Read more: Accidental rain making and multi-purpose pools

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