New management model needed for school toilets

By: Water Research Commission (WRC)

What are some of the major challenges facing sanitation in South African schools?

School toilets often end up as the ‘Cinderella’ of school infrastructure – a part of the school neglected and hidden from view, and often in appalling condition. And yet, toilets are intended to meet one of learners’ most basic, unavoidable physical needs. So, if school toilets aren’t structurally safe or hygienic, they can pose a threat to kids’ health, dignity and even their lives – and these dangers can compromise their ability to learn.

Read more: New management model needed for school toilets

Building latrines to decreases disease in Mali

By: World Health Organisation

Building latrines and changing behaviours means keeping people safe from disease, as the WHO discovered in Mali

Read more: Building latrines to decreases disease in Mali

Malawi water project changes lives

By: Kelly-Ann Prinsloo

Water for All and Atlas Copco bring water to 28 000 Malawians

Read more: Malawi water project changes lives

Women and water – the facts

Did you know that women and children around the world spend 125 million hours each day collecting water? This is time that could be spent working, going to school, caring for families, if only these women and children had better access to sustainable, reliable water. Below are some startling facts about women and water, and the difference that could be made by sustainable, reliable plumbing.

Read more: Women and water – the facts

Empowering women through water

By: Katherine Sentlinger – The Water Project

Millions of people live in poverty everyday due to lack of clean water sources. Often, the water sources that are available are polluted and are located very far away. In developing countries, the task of water collection most frequently falls to women and young girls.

Read more: Empowering women through water

How plumbing eradicated disease – part 2

The Rwandan refugee camps set up in Zaire (DRC) in 1994 struggled with outbreaks of dysentery. Sanitation was poor; the refugees defecated openly in common areas. Human waste built up in the same areas where the refugees drew water that was used for cooking and drinking. Heavy rain flooded the area and dysentery became epidemic, at its peak it was killing 2 000 people a day.

Read more: How plumbing eradicated disease – part 2

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