Residents registered as indigent sometimes do not have the means to repair private leaks, resulting in high water consumption.

Russel Chanquin, Superintendent: Meter Management and Councillor Zahid Badroodien, Mayoral Committee Member for Water and Sanitation.

Russel Chanquin, Superintendent: Meter Management and Councillor Zahid Badroodien, Mayoral Committee Member for Water and Sanitation.

Water consumption above the allocated threshold can result in the city limiting residents’ water supply.  The City wants to help indigent residents to be water-wise by repairing private leaks at qualifying properties. This project is a continuation of our Indigent Leak Repair Programme launched earlier this financial year at a value of R3,7 million.

The City’s Water and Sanitation Directorate’s programme will help 872 customers who have already agreed to the repairs being done over the next few months.

‘Customers are currently being identified by analysing indigent registered properties with water consumption above 50 000 litres (50Kl) per month. Households who opted in for the programme will benefit from repairs focusing on leaking internal pipes, taps, toilets, fittings, and meter replacements, determined by individual needs. We will complete the work at no cost to the property owners and only want to reduce water losses and encourage residents to maintain private pipes and fittings.

‘Last year, we helped 534 households, and this year we expanded the Leak Repair Programme to more residents. Our teams work closely with our identified clients, keeping them informed every step of the way, from pre-inspection, where we identify leaks, material procurement and planning to service the property.

‘A larger uptake of our programme is encouraging and shows that Capetonians are still committed to water-wise behaviours. It is important for all of us to continue saving water regardless of the season or our dam levels,’ said Mayoral Committee Member for Water and Sanitation Councillor Zahid Badroodien.

Note:

Let’s all collectively work together to use less than 850 million litres daily. This is so we can keep our dams and reservoirs fuller for longer and help reduce the impact of prolonged high stages of load-shedding.

For the Water By-law summary guide, see: www.capetown.gov.za/waterregulations

 

Group photo.

Editor’s comment: trust that all plumbers are qualified or at least assisting these volunteers. Cape Town has exceptionally good, qualified plumbers. An excellent initiative.